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History

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana (1905), The Life of Reason
  • Historical Events 1668 – Isaac Newton receives MA from Trinity College, Cambridge 1799 – Ranjit Singh's men take up their positions outside Lahore 1838 – Central American federation is dissolved 1939 – Wimbledon Men's Tennis: Bobby Riggs beats fellow American Elwood Cooke 2-6, 8-6, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 for Wimbledon sweep, also won doubles and mixed doubles titles 1987 – Kiwanis Clubs end men-only tradition, vote to admit women 2016 – Deadlock in battle for Aleppo broken when Russian air strikes cut rebel access to the city, 250,000 people put under siege More Historical Events » Famous Birthdays 1900 – Earle […]
  • The trailblazing aviator’s disappearance remains a source of fascination—and controversy.
  • June 26, 2015 marks a major milestone for civil rights in the United States, as the Supreme Court announces its decision in Obergefell v. Hodges. By one vote, the court rules that same-sex marriage cannot be banned in the United States and that all same-sex marriages must be recognized nationwide, …
  • On the morning of June 27, 2015, activists posing as joggers signal to one of their comrades that the police have momentarily turned their attention away from the flagpole outside the South Carolina State House. Having received the signal, Brittany "Bree" Newsome scales the pole, takes down the …
  • A dramatic battle in the Tennessee House of Representatives ends with the state ratifying the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution on August 18, 1920. After decades of struggle and protest by suffragettes across the country, the decisive vote is cast by a 24-year-old representative who …
  • On July 20, 1865, a Frenchman named Pierre Lallement arrives in the United States, carrying the plans and components for the first modern bicycle. Lallement constructed and patented the first bicycle in the United States, but received no significant reward or recognition for introducing the nation …
  • Hearing arguments in the case of the Zong, a slave ship, the Chief Justice of the King’s Bench in London states that a massacre of African slaves “was the same as if Horses had been thrown over board” on June 22, 1783. The crew of the Zong had thrown at least 142 captive Africans into […]
  • On June 15, 2006, on the remote island of Spitsbergen halfway between mainland Norway and the North Pole, the prime ministers of Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland lay the ceremonial first stone of the Global Seed Vault. The vault, which now has the capacity to hold 2.25 billion seeds, is …
  • Robert Falcon Scott’s ship, the Terra Nova, sets sail from Cardiff, Wales on June 15, 1910, bound for Antarctica. Though it will succeed in reaching its objective, the expedition will end in tragedy as Scott and his companions give up their lives in order to become the second party to reach the …
  • On the afternoon of March 15, 2019, a gunman attacked two different mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand during Friday Prayer, killing 51, wounding 40, and deeply scarring a nation that had, until this point, believed itself to be safe from the scourges of gun violence and far-right terrorism. It …
  • On the evening of June 17, 2015, a mass shooter took the lives of nine African American people at a Bible study at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The massacre at a historic black church deeply shook a nation already jaded by frequent gun violence and …
  • For Michael and Robert, the quick peck before a walk around the lake with Michael’s son was an ordinary moment. For J. Ross Baughman, it was the moment he was positioned for and waiting to capture. Gay Dads Kissing was a history-making photograph that continues to hearten and resonate with many. The story of Gay […]
  • Lena Richard was an African American chef who built a culinary empire in New Orleans during the Jim Crow era. She reshaped public understanding of New Orleans’ cuisine by showcasing and celebrating the black roots of Creole cooking in a time when pervasive racial stereotypes surrounded the food industry. Her story, however, has never been […]
  • Note: While history shouldn’t require a spoiler alert, this blog does contain some minor ones regarding the HBO series Watchmen.“You know how you can tell the difference between a masked cop and a vigilante?”“No.”“Me neither.”This exchange between Laurie Blake, former costumed vigilante turned FBI agent, and Angela Abar, masked Tulsa police detective, lays out a […]
  • The trouble began soon after well-known social reformer Emily Bissell had finished her remarks at the meeting of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage’s Washington, D.C., branch. As audience members got ready to leave that March 1912 evening, supporters of woman suffrage stationed themselves at the doorway to press pro-suffrage materials. The conflict grew […]
  • Maybe this painting looks familiar. A long row of red-coated soldiers. A cloud of gun smoke engulfing the street. Falling bodies.Detail of a painting of the Boston Massacre on a mirror in the collection.But not every depiction of the Boston Massacre puts an African American man at the center. Doing so asks for reflection, and […]
  • Mary Edwards Walker defied convention in just about everything she did. Walker was uncompromising in her beliefs about herself and the world she lived in. She declined to conform to social expectations, which sometimes cost her greatly; until her dying day Walker refused to be anyone but herself, a trait even some of her detractors […]
  • In March 1995, Ladies Home Journal named Dr. Florence Haseltine one of the ten most important women in medicine. Haseltine, currently Presidential Distinguished Professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, has long been identified as one of the nation’s leading advocates for women’s health. Having earned a PhD in biophysics from MIT and an […]
  • Maggie Lena Walker was one of the most important Black businesswomen in the nation, and today too few people have heard of her.Maggie Lena Walker, from the Scurlock Studio Records in our Archives Center.Maggie Lena Walker was the first Black woman in the nation to organize and run a bank. And she did it in […]
  • Every election season in the United States revolves around a set of issues—health care, foreign affairs, the economy. In 1868, at the height of the Reconstruction, the pressing issue was black male suffrage. When voters went to the polls that November, they were asked to decide if and how their nation's democracy should change to […]
  • The museum has created a new collecting initiative focused on how undocumented activists are leading fights for political representation. On face value, it seems unusual that people without citizenship could be a force in government.  It’s unusual but not unprecedented. In fact, these new acquisitions  will add to existing collections that highlight how people—without citizenship […]
  • Angus McDougall, a teacher from Hiram, Ohio, enrolled in the Master of Arts in American History and Government (MAHG) program for many of the same reasons other teachers do. He appreciated its schedule, planned for the convenience of working teachers. Comparing it to American history programs at other universities, he saw that MAHG, unlike the […]
  • Among speeches denouncing slavery, perhaps the most effective ever delivered is Frederick Douglass’s “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” Douglass proposed to answer this charged question on the day following its annual celebration, July 5, 1852. He spoke to the Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society of Rochester, New York, a feminine audience who needed […]
  • Less than a week before he left office, President Eisenhower delivered his final speech to the American public, a speech that would come to be known as his Farewell Address. In the most famous portion of the address, Eisenhower warns against the danger of the “military-industrial complex.” The term so neatly captured an emerging phenomenon […]
  • On July 4, 2020, The American Revolution—the latest volume in Ashbrook’s Core Document Collections—will be released. Edited by Robert McDonald, Professor of History at the United States Military Academy at West Point, the collection is available for pre-order only through TAH. This volume of primary documents on the causes and conduct of the American Revolution […]
  • South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union when a convention in Charleston approved an Ordinance of Secession in December of 1860. Few Americans, during that tumultuous secession winter, foresaw a lengthy civil war. Few Americans predicted the war would bring horrific casualty rates, the devastation of the South, or the emancipation […]
  • The hour was late when Frederick Douglass rose to speak to more than fifty African-American leaders who had gathered in Washington, DC, to honor him and celebrate emancipation. The elaborate banquet, as recounted in David W. Blight's recent biography; Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, included notable figures from a broad spectrum of black life in […]
  • At Teaching American History, we focus on telling America's story through historical documents because history functions for a nation as memory does for an individual.  Without memory, an individual or a nation has no identity, and ultimately, no existence. Our teacher partners are the nation's memory-keepers, passing on our national identity to the next generation […]
  • On June 13th, 1775, American troops around Boston learned of a British plan to occupy the hills on the Charlestown peninsula, north of the city, providing them with a commanding view of the area and enabling artillery to be used against American forces there. Acting on this information, Col. William Prescott on June 16th led […]
  • Frequent visitors to Teaching American History.org tell us we are their go-to site for primary sources. We love hearing that. But we are never satisfied!  We are always looking for more effective ways to package primary sources in our database to give teachers maximum flexibility in meeting students' needs, especially the needs of reluctant or struggling readers.  […]
  • On July 4, 2020, the 244th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, a new volume in Ashbrook’s Core Document Collections will appear: The American Revolution. Robert McDonald, Professor of History at the United States Military Academy at West Point, edited the collection (which is available for pre-order only through TAH). McDonald frequently teaches the Revolution […]
  • by John Berlau John Berlau’s biography presents a fresh take on George Washington’s pursuits as a private citizen after his life as America’s most renowned general, covering his many innovations across several industries. The following excerpt discusses Washington’s initial interest … Read the article The post The Unexplored Life of George Washington, Entrepreneur appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Jeffrey B. Burton Jeffrey B. Burton, author of The Finders, a fast-paced new mystery novel featuring a heroic golden retriever cadaver dog, discusses the fascinating and tragic history of war dogs utilized in World War I. OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN… Read the article The post The Casualty Dogs of World War I appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Greg King and Penny Wilson In 1956, a stunned world watched as the famous Italian ocean liner Andrea Doria sank after being struck by a Swedish vessel off the coast of Nantucket. The following is an excerpt from The … Read the article The post The Sinking of the World’s Most Glamorous Ship appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Michael Eric Dyson In 1963, Attorney General Robert Kennedy sought out James Baldwin to explain the rage that threatened to engulf black America. In What Truth Sounds Like, Michael Eric Dyson draws lessons from their meeting and applies them … Read the article The post Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Tom Clavin In an excerpt from his latest book, Tombstone, Tom Clavin discusses the Earp family’s arrival in Arizona, focusing on Virgil Earp’s initial acts as a lawman. The Earps’ early days in Tombstone were not auspicious ones. An … Read the article The post “You Will Have to Fight Anyway” appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Giles Milton Who was Hermann von Oppeln-Bronikowski? And why was he so important to the Germans on D-Day? Turns out, he was the only enemy commander capable of defeating the Allied forces on June 6, 1944. Welcome to Season … Read the article The post D-Day: The German Opposition appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Stephen Puleo Voyage of Mercy is the remarkable story of the mission that inspired a nation to donate massive relief to Ireland during the potato famine and began America’s tradition of providing humanitarian aid around the world. Read on … Read the article The post The Year of Decision appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Catharine Arnold In the final part of her Ship of Death essay, Catharine Arnold wraps up the tragic tale of the USS Leviathan, a troopship that highlighted the devastating spread of the Spanish flu. Whatever the true figure, the … Read the article The post Ship of Death: A Terrifying and Implacable Enemy appeared first on The History Reader.
  • By Daniel Wasserbly In The 300, military and security expert Daniel Wasserbly introduces the elite unit tasked with protecting the nation from long-range weapons of mass destruction. Read on for an excerpt. Winston Churchill with his daughter Mary and General… Read the article The post The Rise of America’s Missile Defense System appeared first on The History Reader.
  • by Jane K. Cleland If you want to know about a society’s values, mores, and conventions, look to the decorative elements common during that era. Join Novelist Jane K. Cleland as she reflects on different objects from the past to … Read the article The post A Window into the Past appeared first on The History Reader.
  • It will probably come as no surprise that the Fourth of July is one of our favorite holidays here at AAS! In recent years, AAS staff has written about a number of topics on the holiday. We’ve written about how AAS founder Isaiah Thomas celebrated in 1814 in the midst of the War of 1812; […]
  • Much of my bookbinding life has been spent in cramped, overheated, and windowless rooms hidden away in a basement. It generally comes with the territory. The old AAS conservation lab was certainly an improvement to such experiences, and I’ll always hold fond memories of my time there.  After all, it was home.  While so much […]
  • Working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic has allowed me the opportunity to explore the AAS catalog in fun new ways. Inspired by my family’s board games, which have been stacked in the living room since our transition to remote work, one recent search led to our games collection. While many of the games piqued […]
  • Luke Henter is a senior in the History Department at Princeton University. He studies 19th and 20th century international history, with certificates in the History and Practice of Diplomacy and Creative Writing. He has also worked at the Princeton Historical Review and is a member of the Community Service Interclub Council at Princeton. As a […]
  • Staff at AAS have been sad and frustrated about Covid-19’s effects on our researchers, fellows, and fellow cultural institutions. Despite this hardship, we’ve been able to find some joy in our days and to feel connected to the collections we love by working on a staff-wide transcription of the first AAS donation book. For those […]
  • When AAS was tasked with creating the physical catalog for Radiant with Color & Art to coincide with the opening of the McLoughlin Brothers exhibition at the Grolier Club in 2017, the focus was (at least from the design perspective) on the eponymous color and art. We tried to frontload the design of that catalog […]
  • In his October 1983 report to the Council, former AAS President Marcus A. McCorison outlined the founding of the Program in the History of the Book (PHBAC), an ambitious initiative that set out to unite four areas of the Society’s work: collections, scholarship, fellowships, and publications.  In the same 1983 report, John Hench, then assistant director […]
  • Black Self-Publishing is a new collaborative research project from the American Antiquarian Society. The core of this site consists of a list I developed of books self-published by black authors within the scope of the American Antiquarian Society’s collecting period (origins to 1876). Studying self-publishing, occasions when an author pays for the printing of his […]
  • May 3rd is an important date for both the American Antiquarian Society and the community of Worcester. On that date in 1775, Isaiah created the first object printed in this community: his newspaper the Massachusetts Spy. In this issue, he described the Battles of Lexington and Concord. While Thomas was present at those battles, his […]
  • In 1995, the Society welcomed its first class of a new kind of fellow. They were the Creative and Performing Artist and Writers Fellows, and they included fiction writers, poets, playwrights, visual artists, sculptors, performance artists, and musicians, as well as non-fiction writers, documentary filmmakers, journalists anyone seeking to create original works based upon American […]
Influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital near Fort Riley, Kansas in this 1918 file photo. The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic killed at least 20 million people worldwide and officials say that if the next pandemic resemblers the birdlike 1918 Spanish flu, to 1.9 million Americans could die. (AP Photo/National Museum of Health)
  • by John Berlau John Berlau’s biography presents a fresh take on George Washington’s pursuits as a private citizen after his life as America’s most renowned general, covering his many innovations across several industries. The following excerpt discusses Washington’s initial interest … Read the article The post The Unexplored Life of George Washington, Entrepreneur appeared first […]
  • by Jeffrey B. Burton Jeffrey B. Burton, author of The Finders, a fast-paced new mystery novel featuring a heroic golden retriever cadaver dog, discusses the fascinating and tragic history of war dogs utilized in World War I. OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN… Read the article The post The Casualty Dogs of World War I appeared first on […]
  • by Greg King and Penny Wilson In 1956, a stunned world watched as the famous Italian ocean liner Andrea Doria sank after being struck by a Swedish vessel off the coast of Nantucket. The following is an excerpt from The … Read the article The post The Sinking of the World’s Most Glamorous Ship appeared first on […]
  • by Michael Eric Dyson In 1963, Attorney General Robert Kennedy sought out James Baldwin to explain the rage that threatened to engulf black America. In What Truth Sounds Like, Michael Eric Dyson draws lessons from their meeting and applies them … Read the article The post Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America appeared first […]
  • by Tom Clavin In an excerpt from his latest book, Tombstone, Tom Clavin discusses the Earp family’s arrival in Arizona, focusing on Virgil Earp’s initial acts as a lawman. The Earps’ early days in Tombstone were not auspicious ones. An … Read the article The post “You Will Have to Fight Anyway” appeared first on […]
  • by Giles Milton Who was Hermann von Oppeln-Bronikowski? And why was he so important to the Germans on D-Day? Turns out, he was the only enemy commander capable of defeating the Allied forces on June 6, 1944. Welcome to Season … Read the article The post D-Day: The German Opposition appeared first on The History […]
  • by Stephen Puleo Voyage of Mercy is the remarkable story of the mission that inspired a nation to donate massive relief to Ireland during the potato famine and began America’s tradition of providing humanitarian aid around the world. Read on … Read the article The post The Year of Decision appeared first on The History […]
  • by Catharine Arnold In the final part of her Ship of Death essay, Catharine Arnold wraps up the tragic tale of the USS Leviathan, a troopship that highlighted the devastating spread of the Spanish flu. Whatever the true figure, the … Read the article The post Ship of Death: A Terrifying and Implacable Enemy appeared […]
  • By Daniel Wasserbly In The 300, military and security expert Daniel Wasserbly introduces the elite unit tasked with protecting the nation from long-range weapons of mass destruction. Read on for an excerpt. Winston Churchill with his daughter Mary and General… Read the article The post The Rise of America’s Missile Defense System appeared first on […]
  • by Jane K. Cleland If you want to know about a society’s values, mores, and conventions, look to the decorative elements common during that era. Join Novelist Jane K. Cleland as she reflects on different objects from the past to … Read the article The post A Window into the Past appeared first on The […]
  • Peggy Hull was born Henrietta Eleanor Goodnough on a farm near Bennington, Kansas, in 1889. Fascinated by geography since childhood and picturing newspaper work as the best way to “see […]
  • Now in its 18th season, PBS’s ongoing limited series, Secrets of the Dead examines the skeletal remains from the most important archaeological site of the Viking Age—Björkö, Sweden. The town, known […]
  • In his remarkable address, the president argued that the Civil War was God's judgment on America for the evil of slavery and that every means, no matter how how horrific, […]
  • The Partisan Rangers had a big hand in bringing the ‘Gray Ghost’ plenty of glory John Singleton Mosby will always be regarded as one of the Civil War’s most famous—perhaps […]
  • “Polio was never the raging epidemic portrayed in the media, not even at its height in the 1940s and 1950s,” David M. Oshinsky writes in Polio: An American Story. Yet […]
  • Fighting didn’t stop when victorious Allies occupied Berlin; instead, it transitioned to politics.
  • Once-forgotten African American war hero Army Sgt. Henry Johnson is the latest soldier to be featured in a graphic novel series honoring Medal of Honor recipients.
  • Can you identify this mixed-propulsion fighter prototype? for the answer, click here!
  • Curtiss XF15C-1 Late in World War II piston-engine aircraft reached a peak of performance that even carrier-borne planes could achieve. At the same time, turbojet power had demonstrated its potential, […]
  • During periods of inaction, Harvey and his men drilled for encounters with elusive Viet Cong guerillas who stalked the forests.
https://relivinghistorymagazine.com/
Reliving History Magazine: Summer 2018 Issue

Reliving History Magazine

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